Historic Building Details


HB Ref No:
HB16/28/036


Extent of Listing:
Cathedral, gates and gate piers, and railings


Date of Construction:
1820 - 1839


Address :
Cathedral of St. Patrick and St. Colman Hill Street Newry Co Down BT34 1AF


Townland:
Carneyhough






Survey 2:
A

Date of Listing:
2/26/1976

Date of De-listing:

Current Use:
Church

Former Use
Church

Conservation Area:
Yes

Industrial Archaeology:
No

Vernacular:
No

Thatched:
No

Monument:
No

Derelict:
No




OS Map No:
266/7 SW

IG Ref:
J0857 2632





Owner Category


Church - RC

Exterior Description And Setting


Perpendicular style Cathedral, consisting of: nave, chancel, side aisles, transepts, sacristy and bell tower, on the east side of Hill Street. Traditional cruciform plan with tower and sacristy attached to north elevation. Roofs are natural slate and leaded with parapet gutters and box section metal down pipes. Five granite steps with roll moulded nosings rise to a concrete paved area in front of the west end. This elevation consists of a tall gable with central door and large tracery window above. This is flanked by two squat towers, which terminate the ends on the north and south aisles. Between the gable and the towers, are two tall semi-attached octagonal stair towers rising the full height of the elevation and terminating in octagonal lanterns above the parapet. West end: central gable Wall to façade (West End) is ashlar granite, with a raised chamfered base course. Main door is set within a deeply recessed Tudor arched opening with five ribs (three of which are colonettes) to its canted reveal. Over is a hoodmould with stop-ends. Pair of oak doors are framed and braced t+g sheeted, stained and varnished with decorative strap-hinges and central ring handle strap decoration, iron beading to all sides and large lockcase locked from inside only. Above is the tall gable window. This consists of granite tracery with stained glass set within a large Gothic opening with canted cill and reveals. Moulded stringcourse at cill level continues across gable and across stair towers. Over opening is hood-mould with figurative stop-ends. Over the window, in the gable head is a small lancet opening (a vent to loft area), with canted reveal and wire-mesh over. The gable has a frieze, which is decorated with a raised Gothic arcade design. This frieze supports a moulded stringcourse, which follows the line of the gable. A parapet rises above and is finished with stepping crenellations and terminated at apex of gable by a square based gabled pinnacle (panelled on three sides) with a granite cross finial. West end: stair towers These rise up each side of main gable at west end. Walls are of ashlar granite with a base course as façade; an additional moulded base course is positioned one course above. The towers are each divided into four stages by a moulded stringcourse. There is a narrow lancet window (glazed with obscure glass) to the front face of the first and second stages. The stringcourse between second and third stages demarcates the eaves level of the side towers that terminate the aisles. The third stage is thus more exposed and only quarter attached to the main gable. Each face of the tower at this stage is decorated with small chamfered rectangular panels, with taller lancet panels over. Supporting the stringcourse between the third and fourth stages is a frieze, with raised Gothic arcade decoration (continuation of that on main gable). The fourth stage rises above the main gable and is octagonal with unglazed tracery openings to each face, creating a fretted open crown which is terminated with a moulded stringcourse and a crenellated parapet. Flanking towers Walls to each face of the side towers are of ashlar granite with chamfered base course (as façade). To each outside corner is a stepped buttress, which terminates as a corner pinnacle. At roof level on both faces is a moulded string course, with arcaded frieze below and crenellated parapet over (all as façade). The west end façade of each tower has a granite tracery window set within a Gothic opening with canted reveals and a hood mould over. The cheeks of each tower are also identical and consist of a door to ground floor centre. It is t+g sheeted with no furniture and is set within an opening with moulded reveal and Tudor arched head within a square headed recess with hood mould over. The panelled spandrels to the arch head are decorated with raised shields. In wall above door is a hood-moulded stained glass, tracery window with details as that on façade of tower. SOUTH ELEVATION South aisle This aisle runs from the tower at southwest corner to the south east side chapel, and is abutted by south transept. Wall is squared granite rubble, laid in regular courses with two snecking stones between each block. Wall is divided into five equal panels by four stepped buttresses in granite ashlar block, which terminate at eaves level. At eaves is a moulded string course with crenellated parapet over. In each wall panel is a traceried window (there are five in number) in a canted Gothic headed opening. South transept South transept abuts the south aisle. It has a door to west cheek, and a window to south and east walls. Walls are of ashlar granite with chamfered base course to west cheek only with string course at eaves level and a crenellated parapet. To each outside corner is a stepped corner buttress terminating in gabled pinnacles. The west cheek has a projecting gabled porch at ground floor centre. High in wall over the porch are two blind tracery panels, each containing a raised shield. The left one has the letters; ‘AD’ in raised type and the right has an ‘1888’ in similar raised letters. Porch is ashlar granite with base course as rest of walls. It has corner buttresses offset at 45 degrees, terminating below eaves level. Eaves to each cheek are concave and support a string course and crenellated parapet which rises up gable and is terminated in a granite cross finial. Three granite steps to doorway in centre of west gable door consists of a pair of Gothic headed t+g sheeted, stained timber with black painted decorative strap-hinges. These are set within a recessed canted opening with Gothic head. Each cheek of porch has a small cusped lancet window with canted cill, decorated voussoirs and metal bars over. South elevation has three Gothic openings with sandstone tracery. Single narrow lancet to sides and three lancet composition to centre. Below is a ground floor projection with a hipped granite roof; plain walls and contains recessed confessionals. East elevation has two Gothic windows with granite tracery with central mullion and transoms forming four lancet lights, below this is a projecting roof over lower part of wall which runs flush with buttress. South side chapel This is abutted to the west by the south aisle and transept, and to the north by the chancel and sanctuary. The walls to south and east are as the south transept, but lower and crenellations step up to each corner. There are two traceried Gothic stained glass granite windows in south elevation with canted reveals and voussoired hood-moulds over. There is a similar window to east elevation; this has a metal grill over. South nave wall Running from the west end gable to the apse at east end is a clerestory wall enclosing the body of the church. At ground floor it is internal (abutted by south aisle) and arcaded. The first bay from west end is dressed ashlar granite, the second and third bay squared granite rubble laid in regular courses, with two snecking stones between each block. Rest of the bays are roughly finished squared granite blocks with clumsy repointing. Wall is divided into eight equal panels by stepped buttresses, which rise to gabled ashlar pinnacles. At eaves is a moulded stringcourse with crenellated parapet over. The first panel is over the southwest tower, the second to the sixth are over the side aisle. The seventh and eighth are over the south transept. In each wall panel is a traceried window in a canted Gothic headed opening with hood mould over. APSE This consists of nine panels; each divided by a stepped, gabled pinnacled buttress, and with a crenellated parapet as the nave. The first two to each side are a continuation of the nave, and are abutted by the side chapels. The remaining five panels form the canted apse. Each panel has a single window at clerestory level. Below parapet running between buttresses is a shallow Gothic arcade similar to that to front façade. Each window is Gothic tracery with canted reveal, hoodmould and cills slope down to form roof over projecting lower wall, the face is flush with corner buttress. NORTH ELEVATION The north elevation is identical to the south, with two additions. Firstly the tower abuts the north aisle and west cheek of the north transept, and the sacristy abuts the north side chapel, and east side of the north transept. North side-chapel. To the south it abuts the apse, to the west is the north transept (see later) and to the north the single storey sacristy link (see later) partially abuts. The remaining walls, to east and north, are of ashlar granite. String course at eaves level and a crenellated parapet. On east wall at ground level is a granite block with “Chancel erected 1904, Most Rev H O’ Neil, DD Lord Bishop of Dromore.” There is a single traceried Gothic stained glass window in east elevation with canted reveal and voussoired hood-mould over (mirror image of east side of south side chapel). There are two similar windows to the north elevation; both have metal grills over. The sacristy abuts below these windows in the north elevation. North transept This abuts the side aisle to the south, the tower to the west and the single storey sacristy to the east. Walls are of ashlar granite with chamfered base course to west cheek only with string course at eaves level and a crenellated parapet. To each outside corner is a stepped corner buttress terminating in gabled pinnacles. In the centre of the elevation is a projecting bay (containing a shrine-niche internally). The north elevation has three Gothic openings. The central opening contains a three part Gothic tracery window and is on the projecting bay. The flanking side windows are narrow sandstone tracery lancets. East elevation is abutted by the single storey link block, which leads to the sacristy. Above are two Gothic windows with granite tracery. North aisle The tower abuts to east (see later). The aisle wall is squared granite rubble, laid in regular courses, with snecking stones between each block. It is divided into five equal panels by four stepped buttresses, which terminate at eaves level. At eaves is a moulded stringcourse with crenellated parapet over. In each wall panel is a traceried window (five in number) set in a canted Gothic headed opening. The tower obscures the eastern panel and its window is infilled with a shrine. North nave wall Running from the west end gable to the apse at east end is a clerestory wall enclosing the body of the church. At ground floor it is internal (abutted by north aisle) and arcaded. The first bay from west end is dressed ashlar granite, the second and third bay squared granite rubble laid in regular courses, with two snecking stones between each block. The rest of the bays are roughly finished squared granite blocks with clumsy repointing. Wall is divided into eight equal panels by stepped buttresses, which rise to gabled pinnacles. At eaves is a moulded stringcourse with crenellated parapet over. The first panel is over the north west tower, the second to the sixth are over the side aisle. Seventh and eighth are over the north transept. In each wall panel is a traceried window in a canted Gothic headed opening with hood mould over. TOWER Tower is square in section and has four stages. It is attached to the north side aisle at first stage level and its first and second stages abut the north transept. Walls are of finely dressed ashlar granite with tall piers rising from second stage to parapet and assorted granite detailing. Stage one Wall is exposed at west and north elevations. The corners are chamfered from half way up first stage. West elevation has a double moulded basecourse and moulded stringcourse three courses higher. Four granite steps rise to a central entrance: consisting of a pair of timber Gothic headed doors, with decorative strap hinges. These are set within a deeply recessed and chamfered Gothic opening, with hood mould over. To left of door is a tubular metal handrail. The north elevation has a single storey outshot to left (containing stairs). There is a single cusped stained glass window in canted reveal to the centre of the elevation. Outshot has canted corner and a parapet above eaves level. Its west cheek has a cusped, stained glass window in a canted reveal. Stage two This stage is exposed on all four sides and is double height. Its wall is recessed within corner piers. At the bottom of the recess the wall is pitched out to the string course at first floor level. Each panel contains two tall, cusped lancet windows divided into two panes by a quatrefoil panel in middle. Each window is stained glass and is set within a chamfered reveal. Each side pier is octagonal (and quarter attached to tower). Between this stage and the third stage is a frieze decorated with a Gothic arcade. Stage three This stage is single storey and has similar central panel and piers as stage below, although octagonal piers transform into plain buttresses. In panel are four narrow lancet windows in chamfered reveals. Above, between this stage and stage four, five moulded corbels supporting a balconette, which encloses the recessed wall panel. Stage four: belfry This stage has a buttress to each face; terminating half way up is a steep, crocketted and finialed gablet. The central panel is not as deeply recessed as those below; it contains a large open tracery window set within deeply recessed Gothic opening. The spring of arch level corresponds with the gablet to each pier. On the cill of the opening is a balconette consisting of six fretted quatrefoils. Between the plain piers, over the arch head, is a blind arcade of fretted, trefoil headed lancets. Between this stage and the parapet is a moulded string course, with projecting gargoyles to corners (at 45 degrees) and to the centre of each elevation. Parapet The corner gargoyles of the stringcourse below support flying buttresses from the fretted pinnacles, which rise from the piers below. Each pinnacle has an open fretwork panel and a crocketted pinnacle with crown and cruciform lightening conductor. They are linked by an open balustrade of delicate lancet panels supporting a moulded coping. The centre of each balustrade supports pinnacle, (set at 45 degrees) similar but smaller than those to the corner and resting on central gargoyle. Roof is leaded and pyramidal with a large wrought iron cross finial to centre. SACRISTY This two storey building is linked to the north side of the north side chapel and the east side of the north transept, by a one storey link block. Roof is hipped and natural slated over main block and pitched and natural slated with skylights to link block. Main block has a granite chimney rising from wall head off centre of east elevation. Walls are of ashlar granite, each corner is chamfered and there is a moulded stringcourse at eaves level with a crenellated parapet above. East elevation is abutted to left by link block, with crenellated parapet. It has a single 1/1 sliding sash window within a chamfered reveal to east and similar to south cheek. The main elevation has five windows to each floor. All are 1/1 sliding sashes set in chamfered Tudor arched reveals. There is one to right and two pairs, one to centre and one to left on each floor. All ground floor windows have bars over. At basement level below the centre windows is a Tudor headed basement door in a two stage opening accessed by a flight of steps from left. The door is t+g panelled, below the left window is a two light opening at ground level with wire mesh over. South elevation is abutted at ground floor by the link block, to first floor are two windows, one to either side of elevation, as those on east elevation. West elevation is abutted by link block and has no window openings. To right of north elevation is the link block gable, which is set back from main elevation. Gable has stepped crenellations and a cross finial. Its door is t+g sheeted and set within a chamfered Tudor headed opening. North elevation has one window to ground floor left and one between ground and first floor at right, and one above to first floor. All are detailed as those on east elevation. CHAPTER ROOMS To the north east corner of the site is a single storey flat roofed modern chapter room. Its walls are ashlar granite with chamfered basecourse and stepped crenellations at eaves level. Date stone over main doors indicates that it was built in 1984. Central block, is a meeting room with three pairs of timber ogee headed windows. To right projecting block with timber door, to right two timber square headed windows. Three further similar windows to return wall to right side. Left block has four square headed windows to façade. Right returns to meeting room wall with stained T&G double doors. SETTING Each side of the front steps is enclosed by a flight of railings which rise from gate piers to left and right on Hill Street. Railings are wrought iron, resting on a chamfered granite base wall. Gate piers are octagonal, with chamfered plinth, panelled faces and decorative wrought iron lamps with globe lanterns. To each side the railings continue to enclose the site, supported by occasional granite piers, with chamfered edges and stepped copings. To south is a formal garden with lawns, paths and flowerbeds. There is an occasional ornate stone garden ornament, and some benches. The south, north and east boundaries are high wet dashed walls.

Architects


Duff, Thomas

Historical Information


Construction commenced on this site, known as Seymour’s Green, in 1825, to designs by Thomas Duff (died 1848); the foundation stone was laid on 8 June 1825. The building was dedicated in 1829 – this was apparently the first such ceremony in a Catholic church after the passing of the Roman Catholic Relief Act in the same year (i.e. removal of the Penal Laws). At that time the building comprised a chancel and nave only. In 1888-90, the transepts, sacristy, and north tower were added. In 1891 a new high altar was erected in memory of Dr Leahy. New bells installed in bell tower in 1898. In 1904-1909 the east end was rebuilt to create the present sanctuary and side chapels. A new sacristy was erected at north-east. The original west front was dismantled and the church extended one bay towards the street with the addition of the present frontage. The interior mosaics, organ, heating and lighting were also installed during this period. A new pulpit (designed by G.C. Ashlin RHA, Dublin) was installed in 1893. In 1919 what had been known as the Pro-Cathedral of St Patrick’s was elevated to the status of the Cathedral of St Patrick and St. Colman Chapter rooms built behind the Cathedral in 1984. New altar designed by Felix Forte (of McLean & Forte, Belfast) and dedicated 1990. The sanctuary was rearranged, the altar repositioned and the seating replanned. All this was in response to Second Vatican Council. Primary Sources: 1. Irish Builder, vol.35, p.135 (15 June 1893). Secondary Sources: 1. Archaeological survey of Co. Down, pp 314, 350 (entry 417.6). 2. 1990 publication ‘Cathedral of SS. Patrick & Colman’ marking dedication of new altar (Newry).

Criteria for Listing


Architectural Interest

A. Style B. Proportion C. Ornamentation D. Plan Form E. Spatial Organisation H+. Alterations enhancing the building I. Quality and survival of Interior J. Setting

Historic Interest

W. National/International Interest V. Historical Association/Authorship Y. Social Importance



Evaluation


Perpendicular style Cathedral in ashlar granite. The impressive silhouette and attractive tower make this building a most striking feature in Newry town. The exceptional quality of the internal finishes including carved stone, timber and mosaic, also contirbute to making this building an outstanding example of its type.

General Comments




Date of Survey


Wednesday, April 12, 2000